Interview: Tom Araya of Slayer

Interview: Tom Araya of Slayer

January 25, 2007 02:35 PM
by Paul Gargano
LiveDaily Contributor

In the past 25 years, Slayer has become more than a band; the group has become a rite of passage.

From the first unholy alliance of frontman/bassist Tom Araya, guitarists Kerry King and Jeff Hanneman, and drummer Dave Lombardo in 1981, through the release of their "Show No Mercy" debut two years later, and beyond the onslaught of last year's "Christ Illusion," they've become the very essence of heavy metal's macabre roots, as well as a lightning rod for bands that hope to prey on the genre's unearthly future.

It's been a quarter-century, but even time can't temper the band whose history has been set ablaze by such legendary releases as "Hell Awaits," "South of Heaven" and "God Hates Us All."

LiveDaily sat down with Araya on the eve of the band's upcoming North American tour--a tour that promises more than just bringing Satan back...

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Interview: Richard On of O.A.R.

Interview: Richard On of O.A.R.

January 18, 2007 01:24 PM
by Christina Fuoco
LiveDaily Contributor

O.A.R. guitarist Richard On speaks openly about his band and its success with the album "Stories of a Stranger," but there's one thing the Ohio State University alum won't discuss: his Buckeyes' stunning 41-14 Bowl Championship Series loss against Florida.

"That was terrible. I don't even want to talk about it. Thank you for your condolences," On said.

On a lighter note, O.A.R. is heading out on its winter tour, kicking off tonight (1/18) in Cincinnati, OH, in support of 2005's Jerry Harrison-produced "Stories of a Stranger." The album spawned O.A.R.'s biggest radio hit, "Love and Memories," co-written with hitmaker Glen Ballard (Alanis Morissette, Christina Aguilera). On admits he was initially taken aback when Ballard initially approached him.

"I met him at the House of Blues one time when we played in LA," On recalled. "I really didn't know who he was. [When] I first saw him, he had this beard--I was like, 'Who is this guy walking around backstage?' I didn't know who he was and he wasn't with our crew. He stopped me in the middle of the hallway and he's like, 'We have to work together. I totally get what you guys are doing.'

"I still had no idea who he was. I thought he was a crazy guy that was roaming the streets of LA. I was like, 'What is he talking about?' I finally found out who he was, and I was like, 'Holy s---. I know who you are.

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Interview: Adam Gontier of Three Days Grace

Interview: Adam Gontier of Three Days Grace

January 11, 2007 01:45 PM
by Christina Fuoco
LiveDaily Contributor

After struggling for years with addiction, Three Days Grace frontman Adam Gontier is thankful for the help he received from Toronto's Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Queen Street facility. He's so grateful that, during his North American tour, he is bypassing the usual afternoon acoustic radio performances to play for rehab and mental-health facilities, as well as homes for troubled children.

"The tours are normally set up where you go to radio stations during the day; you do the typical kind of acoustic thing," Gontier told LiveDaily last month, shortly after his group won a Billboard award for the single "Animal I Have Become." "This was a way for me to sort of give back to that community that turned my life around."

"It was just something that I thought I'd like to do, so I set it up. The biggest thing about it is I want to let kids know and people know that they can talk about it.'"

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Interview: Mark Hoppus of (+44)

Interview: Mark Hoppus of (+44)

January 04, 2007 02:23 PM
by Christina Fuoco
LiveDaily Contributor

When Blink-182 pulled the plug in late 2004, singer/bassist Mark Hoppus said very little publicly about the trio's meltdown.

At the time, tattoo-covered drummer/reality TV star Travis Barker said that, thanks to his and Hoppus' new project (+44), Blink-182 was effectively over. Then, several weeks after (+44) was born, singer/guitarist Tom DeLonge announced he formed Angels and Airwaves.

Hoppus mostly remained mum on the subject until (+44)'s debut album "When Your Heart Stops Beating" was released. He let the songs "No, It Isn't" and "Lycanthrope" do the talking for him. (For those keeping track, a lycanthrope is a bloodthirsty werewolf or spirit.)

"It was actually good, because" [those songs] were about the end of Blink-182," Hoppus said. "I needed to get it out there because I didn't really talk about it in the press. I really didn't talk about it with anybody. When it came time to put it into a song, it went right into music. It was a good cathartic thing to do. That's for sure," Hoppus said.

While recently on a tour bus somewhere between Seattle and Portland, Hoppus spoke to LiveDaily via phone about Barker's one-armed drumming (he broke his right arm filming the video for "When Your Heart Stops Beating"), the dark nature of (+44)'s album and the current state of his relationship with DeLonge.

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